The staging chart above can be downloaded, I beleive this chart can help quickly summarize of all the info……… To Download Chart Click Here

 

 

This page is really created for Medical Students, Physician assistants, Nurse practitioners, Tumor registry personal or anyone else crazy enough to sift through all the TNM criteria with diagrams and clinical imaging. However, if that’s what you want to know then I hope this detailed video will help you to review the TNM criteria and demonstrate it more clearly.

All infomation is obtained from the  AJCC American Joint Committee on Cancer, Cancer Staging Manual. Eighth Edition 2017 (graciously donated by my Cancer Registry Team)

The following video describes each of the TNM categories in detail with coresponding images to help explain them.

T: Tumor size

N: Lymph Node station/location involvement

M: Tumor spread to the lung pleura/linning, other lung or other bodily organs i.e. brain, liver, bone and adrenal

I would not expect a patient or family member to want to listen to all of this, however there are alot of people out there smarter than me and the goal here is to share all the knowledge that we can.

Knowledge is power.

Lymph node levels are often confusing, especially because depending upon where the primary tumor is right or left, a contralateral station 10 node(usually level N1) or station 4 node(usually levelN2) now becomes a level N3 node(this is depicted in the video above).

Starting from the from the low cervicle region which are level 1 nodes the station numbers increase as you go along further down the trachea and out the airways up to station 14 along the sub segmental airways.

The main 3 levels for staging purposes are:

N1: nodes on the same side as the tumor in that lobe or be the airways to it(the hilum): nodal stations 10-14

N2: nodes are along the trachea proper, esophagus or pulmonary ligament same side as the primary tumor: nodal stations 2-9

N3: nodes are on the contralateral side of the trachea/ or supraclavicular-low cervicle region: nodal stations 2-14 on opposite side of the thorax from the primary tumor, or any nodal station 1 in neck.

Be aware:

Lymph node levels are often confusing, especially because depending upon where the primary tumor is right or left, a contralateral station 10 or station 4 node turns from a level N1 or N2 to now a level N3.

Nodal stations 5 and 6 occur only on the left.

Nodal stations 3(retrotracheal/ anterior/posterior) and 7 (subcarinal) are the only midline stations.

 

I can not emphesis enough that the real key to survival is early detection and Lung Screening is a proven method to find lung cancers at an early stage!

Please consult your Primary Care Physician to see if lung screening is right for you.

Please check out our page describing how lung screening works and what it may entail.

Also the page with Staging Diagrams as in the video above.

Seize your lung and seize your life.